Lord, Why Not Call Bill Instead of Me? (Part 7)

Click on following for earlier articles: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 Part 4, Part 5 and Part 6.

Even the most godly leader in the Body of Christ struggles with control issues with other believers or his spouse or his children. Sadly, this is a part of our fallen human nature and must be wrestled against on a daily basis…sometimes on an hourly basis.

But when a leader is an apostle or prophet, a new problem can arise which may be more damaging to people than control ever is. Prophetic bondage.

Why?

Apostles and prophets have their greatest level of authority in the spiritual realm, fighting against demonic principalities and powers. This is where their spiritual DNA is equipped to work best.

For though we walk in the flesh, we do not war according to the flesh, for the weapons of our warfare are not of the flesh, but divinely powerful for the destruction of fortresses. We are destroying speculations and every lofty thing raised up against the knowledge of God, and we are taking every thought captive to the obedience of Christ. (2 Corinthians 10:3-5)

Who was Paul referring to with his usage of the pronouns we and our in the above scriptures? It can’t be the whole Body of Christ because of how verses one and two are written. These only refer to the apostle Paul. Thus, the we and our pronouns have to refer to an apostle (in this case, Paul) and the apostle’s group.

And what callings did Paul team up with on his travels? Other apostles and prophets.

Now consider this: it’s tough for apostles and prophets to rise up everyday and fight demons. There are no days off. No vacations. No R & R. Everyday it’s the same-o, same-o. Fight! Fight! Fight! And it matters not what family members or others do, because apostles and prophets are spiritual warriors and must fight.

Let’s say that an apostle or prophet backs off his  spiritual warfare duties and decides not to engage the enemy in battle. And maybe this happens because of personal hurts, spiritual wounds, weariness, not spending enough time worshipping Jesus or whatever.

But if he does back off, and still tries to minister in his calling to others, problems can arise. Look at what Paul said he was fighting against in 2 Corinthians 10:5 –

...speculations…lofty things raised up against the knowledge of God…disobedient thoughts.

And not only is the apostle and prophet open to speculations, lofty things and disobedient thoughts, Paul mentioned something else when he was talking about false apostles in 2 Corinthians 11:4

For if one [an apostle] comes and preaches another Jesus whom we have not preached, or you receive a different spirit which you have not received, or a different gospel which you have not accepted, you bear this beautifully. (2 Corinthians 11: 4)

An apostle or prophet who stops fighting demonic principalities and powers is not sitting on a neutral sideline, safe and sound, protected by a heavenly shield. Not at all. He’s still in the battle. You see, Satan’s army never takes a day off and never quits attacking the ones they recognize who can cause them the most damage.

And who can cause principalities and powers the most trouble? Apostles and prophets.

So, if an apostle or prophet does not fight, the enemy will come and own a piece of him. And what piece will the enemy own? A part of the prophetic side of the apostle and prophet. Maybe just a small piece, but it may be  enough to place other people, especially callings, in prophetic bondage.

Then it happened in the spring, at the time when kings go out to battle, that David sent Joab and his servants with him and all Israel…but David stayed at Jerusalem. (2 Samuel 11:1)

Because King David, a prophet, did not go to battle, he committed adultery, murder, lost his kingdom for a while and caused the House of David problems for hundreds of years.

So, how was I finally set free from the prison with a steeple on the roof?

(Continued in Part 8.)

10 Comments

Filed under Christianity, Christians, Church, church planting, Emergent Church, Faith, Gifts of the Spirit, God, grace, Home Church, jesus, Kingdom of God, Prayer, Prophecy, reformation, Religion, spiritual warfare

10 responses to “Lord, Why Not Call Bill Instead of Me? (Part 7)

  1. I’m noticing a short supply of comments on this series. It’s more than the season. This is tough stuff–meat to chew on. I’m eager to hear about your journey to freedom.

  2. Close to home, this one.

  3. Solveig and Anna,

    Thanks for the comments.

  4. I agree with both comments above.

    Do not be discouraged by less number of comments on this series. From experience, that often means people’s status quo and lukewarmness is being challenged by your writings and it is much easier to write a comment or read an article when the element of conviction is taken out of it.

    There is much wisdom in what you write and much to ponder on, but overall I can relate to much of what you are sharing here. Busyness is taking over my life these days and I need to get on the praying saddle and not let the enemy gain territory.

    With love,

    Mercedes

  5. “apostles and prophets are spiritual warriors and must fight.”

    Interesting stuff Larry. It explains a lot about my life. This little part I quoted sums it up best for me. I’ll be thinking about this one for awhile.

    Mike

  6. In my defense, I haven’t commented simply because I’ve been out of this circle for a little bit…
    this is actually a lot to think about…

    but, why, Lary, why do you always want me to take up a sword and fight? I want to wallow in my peace bubble here in Fargo.

  7. Pingback: Lord, Why Not Call Bill Instead of Me? (Part 8) « Larry Who

  8. Mike and Cindy,

    Thanks for your comments.

  9. Pingback: Lord, Why Not Call Bill Instead of Me? (Part 9) « Larry Who

  10. Pingback: Lord, Why Not Call Bill Instead of Me? (Part 10) « Larry Who

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