Category Archives: Bridge of Hope

Why I No Longer Support Gospel For Asia!

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This is an article that I never once thought I would write, but even though I hate doing it, I have no choice.

Just so you know: all of the people I have encountered at Gospel For Asia, including Brad, Clara, Elicia, Ron, Tony, Amanda, Cynthia, Corinna, Veronica, Steven, Natalya, Jessieka, and others, have been awesome servants of God. I have enjoyed working with them.

But sadly, K. P. Yohannan and the leaders who make the business decisions for Gospel For Asia — and we’re talking millions and millions of dollars — have not been as forthcoming and honest as they must be in their handling of large sums of money for Kingdom of God purposes.

What has caused me to change my mind about Gospel For Asia?

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/warrenthrockmorton/tag/gospel-for-asia/

http://www.gfadiaspora.com

The info on these two links was just too much for me to overlook.

Now, does this mean that I no longer agree with the books written by K. P. Yohannan, including No Longer A Slumdog and Revolution in World Missions? No, not at all. These are two of the finest books that I have ever read and their teachings will impact me for the rest of my life. I also agree with many of Yohannan’s teachings.

Do I require churches and ministries to be perfect? Of course not, we all make mistakes. But I do insist on integrity, honesty, and transparency when it comes to handling money, especially millions and millions of dollars, otherwise we are no better than the world system.

So, forgive me, if I have misled any of you readers in the past.

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Filed under 10/40 Window, Bridge of Hope, Christianity, Church, Gospel For Asia, India, Kingdom of God, Poverty, Prayer, spiritual warfare

Yohannan Makes Me Cry

K.P. Yohannan was a tongue-tied 16-year-old when God sent him on a journey that would transform the way he and millions of others think about and live out the Great Commission. But the story doesn’t end with him. (RevolutionBook.org)

I can point out all of the verses in the Bible on why we should give financial offerings to foreign missions. We are blessed for doing so.

But even so, it still comes down to where we will give our offerings, and to be honest, there are probably many reputable ministries that are doing great work on the foreign mission fields. God bless them all.

So, why do I give to Gospel For Asia?

Because K. P. Yohannan makes me cry. Yes, that’s right, Yohannan makes me weep.

I have never met the man, which might be a good thing, because I would probably break down and blubber all over him if he just said, “Hi.”

The reason I weep is that I can hear his broken heart crying out for the lost and the unreached people of Asia. His brokenness helps to break the hardness off my apathetic heart. I am not there yet, but thank God, maybe there is still hope for people like me.

If you are interested, check out Revolution in World Missions and the eleven short videos.

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Filed under 10/40 Window, Bridge of Hope, Christianity, Gospel For Asia, India, Poverty, Prayer

How Do You Change a Nation in One Generation?

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If everything would have gone well, Moses would have led Israel out of Egypt and into the Promised Land within thirty days. But the Israelites could not grasp God’s faithfulness after suffering such deep anguish from their cruel bondage in Egypt. So, many months were spent traveling between Mt. Sinai and the Jordan River.

When the nation finally arrived at Kadesh Barnea, they sent twelve men to spy out the Promised Land. The spies returned forty days later. Ten men gave a bad report and two a good one. Sadly, Israel believed the bad report.

But your little ones, whom you said would be victims, I will bring in, and they shall know the land which I swore I would make you dwell in. (Numbers 14:31)

God required Israel to spend one year in the wilderness for each day the spies spent searching out the Promised Land, or forty years. And except for Joshua and Caleb, God did not allow any person over the age of twenty to enter Canaan.

Thus, God trained and changed Israel in forty years or one generation.

How do you change a nation in one generation? You do it through the youth.

In No Longer A Slumdog, K. P. Yohannan wrote about his vision of vast wheat fields, ready for a harvest. He ran toward the fields, knowing they represented millions of souls for the kingdom of God. But Yohannan came to a raging river he could not cross. He stood there and wept.

All of a sudden there appeared before me a bridge reaching from one side of the vast river to the other. It was not a narrow bridge, but one that was very broad. It was completely filled with little children from all over Asia − poor, destitute children, like those I’d often seen on the streets of Calcutta, Kathmandu and other Asian Cities.

Then it was as though someone spoke to me and said, “If you want to have this harvest, it’s all yours. But this is the bridge you must cross to get it.” (No Longer A Slumdog by K. P. Yohannan, Copyright © 1982, page 90)

Yohannan’s vision is now coming to pass through Gospel For Asia’s Bridge of Hope ministry. 70,000 children are now being educated and trained to reach their families, communities, and India with the love of Jesus. And it is working because lives are being changed.

But remember this: there are 1.2 billion people in India.

So, Gospel For Asia is praying for their Bridge of Hope ministry to grow to 500,000 children.

Like Israel, we can either believe the bad report that India is too big to ever change or we can join in with Gospel For Asia and help change the nation in one generation.

If you are interested in sponsoring a Bridge of Hope child, go here, but if you just want to make a one time gift, click on the MyGFA photo below.

Click on to see MyGFA site.

Click on to see MyGFA site.

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Why Do I Support Gospel For Asia?

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I had a vision on December 24, 1993, in which I saw thousands and thousands of dark-skinned starving children. They screamed at the top of their lungs from hunger. The mothers held their children while the fathers stood next to them. All of the parents stared at me with pleading eyes, which begged, “Would you help us? Please!”

The screams echoed in my ears and pierced my heart. I fell on the carpet and wept so much I thought the anguish would swallow me up. Whatever my life’s plans were before that moment no longer mattered because I knew that I had to help the hungry, poor, and helpless children of the world.

A second vision in early 1994 reenforced my calling. In it, I saw myself arriving in heaven, but not for a glorious homecoming. A line of dark-skinned children, as far as I could see, waited to talk with me. Each, in turn, said, “I did not make it into my divine calling on earth because you failed to fulfill your calling of helping us. I starved to death as a young child.”

Let me tell you: I do not ever want to arrive in heaven and have that happen to me. The anguish I felt looking onto those children’s eyes erased the joy of being in Paradise. If that was a sample of the pain a person could feel in heaven, I’d hate to ever visit Hell.

Now, let’s fast forward to 2011 when we received a free copy in the mail of No Longer A Slumdog by K. P. Yohannan. The title caught my attention because of the movie by a similar name. I sat down and began reading it.

There were stories about Muttu, Asha, Lata, Vichy, Tusli, and other names of poor children I could not pronounce. I read about a mother who sold her baby for ten pounds of rice. I learned about India’s caste system and how the lowest rung, the Dalits, are considered subhuman and worthy of being treated like dogs. The Dalits comprise twenty percent of India’s population or approximately the same population as the USA.

Every word acted like a rock thrown against my plastic Western Christianity, creating cracks in it. Yet, it was this specific sentence on Page 31, which penetrated my heart:

“In India alone, there are 11 million children like Asha who have been abandoned, and 90% of them are girls.”

All I could think about were the 9.9 million abandoned little girls. If I closed my eyes, I saw little children, but their faces resembled my daughter, Susan, when she was four years old. I could not ignore my heart this time.

My wife and I now sponsor nine children in Gospel For Asia’s Bridge of Hope program. I am a volunteer advocate for Bridge of Hope, a Gospel For Asia blogger, a member of their prayer team, and have just opened a MyGFA entitled, “No Longer A Slumdog X 100.” My goal is to raise $42,000 to sponsor 100 kids.

S0, why do I support Gospel For Asia?

When I arrive in heaven, I want to meet parents and kids who will say to me, “Thanks for helping us.”

Click on to see MyGFA site.

Click on to see MyGFA site.

 

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Chapter 44: No Longer A Slumdog

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In 1995, Janelle told me about K. P. Yohannan and his ministry, Gospel for Asia. She loaned me a book, Revolution in World Missions by Yohannan, which I quickly forgot about until New Year’s Day, 1996. Since I had nowhere to go on that holiday and no TV to watch football bowl games, I hunkered down and read the book.

Yohannan wrote in one part how overwhelmed he felt by the size of India and his meager resources. He cried out to the Lord and eventually the Lord spoke the following to his heart:

“I am not in any trouble that I need someone to beg for Me. I made no promises I will not keep to you. It is not the largeness of the work that matters, but only doing what I command. All I ask of you is that you be a servant. For all who join with you in the work, it will be a privilege − a light burden for them.” (Revolution in World Missions by K. P. Yohannan)

The Lord’s response so blessed me that I wrote the words in my Bible. Although Carol and I began sponsoring a GFA missionary in 2006, I paid little attention to the ministry, except for a few glances at the words written in my Bible.

Fast forward until 2011 when we received a free copy in the mail of No Longer A Slumdog by K. P. Yohannan. The title caught my attention because of the movie by a similar name. I sat down and began reading it. I wept often and asked forgiveness again and again of the Lord as the book uncovered my selfishness.

There were stories about Muttu, Asha, Lata, Vichy, Tusli, and other names of poor children I couldn’t pronounce. I read about a mother who sold her baby for ten pounds of rice. I learned about India’s caste system and how the lowest rung, the Dalits, comprise twenty percent of India’s population or nearly 300 million people. The Dalits are considered subhuman, worthy of being treated like dogs.

Every word acted like a rock thrown against my plastic Western Christianity, creating cracks in it. Yet, it was this specific sentence on Page 31, which penetrated my heart:

“In India alone, there are 11 million children like Asha who have been abandoned, and 90% of them are girls.” (Revolution in Missions by K. P. Yohannan)

All I could think about were the 9.9 million abandoned little girls. If I closed my eyes, I saw little children, but their faces resembled my daughter, Susan, when she was four years old. I could not ignore my heart this time.

My wife and I now sponsor six children in Gospel For Asia’s Bridge of Hope program. I am a volunteer advocate for Bridge of Hope, a Gospel For Asia blogger, and a member of their prayer team.

In the foreword to No Longer A Slumdog, Francis Chan wrote:

“I am very thankful for the book you are about to read. It has stirred my heart once again. Living in the West with all of its influences, it is easy to forget about others…”

I recommend this book to everyone, and who knows? It may change your life, too.

(The above is Chapter 44 from my memoir: The Hunt for Larry Who)

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Friday’s Prayers for Prisoners (4/18/2014)

 

 

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I have been rereading No Longer a Slumdog by K. P. Yohannan this week:

One of the hardest things to witness is the large number of little boys and girls looking into our Gospel for Asia Bridge of Hope Centers wanting to be involved, but unable to join.

…The hardest part is turning down child after child and seeing them suffer without firsthand contact with the love of the Lord. Honestly, there are so many children out there who need our help. One of the biggest requests from our leaders is, “Can we please open up more centers?”

As we have more resources, we proceed with opening more centers. But there are so many times, I have to tell our leaders, “Not yet.” (No Longer a Slumdog, K. P. Yohannan, © 2011 by K. P. Yohannan, GFA Books, pages 145)

Each morning my heart is blessed when I pray for the six children on the bulletin board over the computer that Carol and I sponsor for Bridge of Hope. But then, my heart is broken when I consider the millions we are not able to sponsor. I always pray, “Lord, don’t let them slip through the cracks of eternity without hearing about You.”

Today, I prayed:

Lord, enrich us Americans in every way to be generous in every way so that we produce many thanksgivings to You. (Based on 2 Corinthians 9:11)

What do you think and has the Lord spoken to you?

Join with me on Fridays to fast and pray for prisoners, according to Hebrews 13:3.

No Longer a Slumdog is now free at Gospel for Asia. You can check it out here.

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I Want This Girl On My Prayer Team. What About You?

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Obviously, the photographer helped set up the above photo and probably said something like, “Put your hands together and pray.”

The two Dalit children on the left side of the photo obeyed the directions, but still kept their dark eyes on the photographer. Their curiosity was too big a hurdle to overcome, and to be honest, I would have done the same at their ages.

The Dalit girl in blue seemed to care little about the activity around her and took the opportunity to pray. Maybe she’s praying for her parents. Or her grandparents. Or her brothers and sisters. Or her neighbors. Or whatever.

Do you think God listens to her prayers?

After all, God has a lot of problems to handle right now, with Israel and Syria most likely topping the list. And the girl is just another Dalit child who is dirt poor, an untouchable in India’s caste system, and the least of the least in the world’s largest democracy.

Yet, when she prays, I believe all of heaven is poised to move on her behalf.

Take heed that ye despise not one of these little ones; for I say unto you, That in heaven their angels do always behold the face of my Father which is in heaven. (Matthew 18:10)

This photo reminds me of the six children Carol and I sponsor in Gospel For Asia’s Bridge of Hope program. Every letter we receive from our kids tells how much they enjoy praying for us.

So, when you think of Larry Who, think about Team Larry Who and our six kids praying for us.

If you want, you can start building your own team today by going here. Your team can be as large as you want…that’s up to you.

 

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